Pacing Myself for Success

Dec 15, 2014


As you dream about your career, you are likely fantasizing about romantic opportunities to become a key decision maker in a Fortune 100 company with endless resources and unimaginable business freedom. However, unless your last name is Jobs or Walton, this might not be a realistic vision of your future.

 

I share in this dream but have also always envisioned myself creating my own business because I know I have what it takes to make it successful. Which is why I was so surprised by the pace I need to operate at in order to be successful in my new role leading the team at Hirschfeld Marketing Services.

 

I haven’t been in my job for 30 days yet but already feel like I am behind where I want to be by six months. However, I believe that if I can stay focused longer and put in more hours than the competition, we will be unstoppable no matter how much of a head start others have over us. As you can imagine, this belief has caused me to struggle with pacing myself.  

 

You often hear business leaders talk about being “on the business” versus “in the business.” The most difficult part for me, like many other business leaders, is finding dedicated time to be “on the business” when there are so many “in the business” tasks that demand my attention. I am trying to address this constant push and pull by scheduling my day more effectively; I have broken my day into blocks of time that are filled with tasks that I have to accomplish to be “on the business” (VIP – Very Important Priorities) and tasks that will keep the team aligned and moving forward (Tactical Priorities). I hope that by controlling as much of the chaos as possible and making time for the VIPs I will be able stay on purpose both personally and professionally. 

 

I know this journey isn’t going to be an easy one but what fun would it be if it was?

 

Let me know what our team at Hirschfeld Marketing Services can do for you,

Michael


Tags: Personal Development, Balance, Michael Verlatti, Pace


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